Category Archives: Business

07 Nov

Excuses are a Waste of Time, let’s work on it!

So I was talking with my friend Tihomir – also co-host of IT Serbia Podcast – about the fact that it’s really getting harder and harder to find time to do an episode. I mean we always have very good excuses, really. But then he shared this link with me and I have to say this guy Grant Cardone is pretty smart when saying that:

If you’re making excuses you are wasting time.

This is definitely something to think about, right? I am sure many of us “loose time” from time to time and actually end up doing nothing (useful) for hours, sometimes even days, although I highly doubt generally busy people can be bored for days.

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19 Jun

How do you share your contact?

You’re an entrepreneur, a go-getter, trend-setter, a ninja-guru-master or just a person who talks to people on a daily basis, maybe visit a conference or two, attend a bunch of seminars? Hey – me too! That means you’re sharing your contact information with a lot of people in a single month, just like I do. So, how do you do it?

Business cards are cool. Especially those gold-plated shiny tokens of one’s public status or position in the ever-growing market. It’s always funny to me that we still need them in the 21st century, but fact is we do. They are just…so cool. And they tend to remind the ones we give them to that we may be someone special and that we may share a common cause or interest. But we don’t always use them. We forget to bring them – God knows I always do due to frequent change of accessories – or we simply share our Twitter account or LinkedIn profile, or even type our phone number to someone’s smartphone.

A couple of days ago a company I work with published a fancy new iOS app that could totally change the way we share our contact information. They call it “Share My Contact” and it’s a kind of a virtual business card with a lot of options for selectively sharing your contact information in different formats.

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18 May

An on-site learning experience for software engineers

Education is getting more and more specific. Instead of simply teaching computer programming using general topics, some colleges in the U.S. are now actually pushing for curriculums that target a specific subject. One of the topics that caught my attention is casino software.

Apparently, fifteen community colleges in Massachusetts have added a casino syllabus in order to properly educate both programmers and non-programmers on how to handle the floor operations of a casino. The casino industry is cutthroat and ever-changing, which is why people who wish to work in this particular field need special training.

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25 May

“Hashtags don’t make you an expert”

Are you one of those people who like to list a ton of stereotypical keywords when applying for a job? Do you advertise yourself as creative, outgoing, smart person with this or that hobby? Do you claim to know an endless number of programming languages or are you by chance from the Balkans and claim to speak four languages – Serbian, Bosnian, Croatian and Montenegrin – even though it’s practically the same language?

If you were on Twitter, I bet you could turn each and every one of those stereotypes into a hashtag and try to put it in your one liner – A #super #awesome #creative #ruby #python #php #java #angular #developer that does #yoga and plays #amateur #tennis! Wow, you just burned my eyes…

Please, let me tell you something… Hashtags don’t make you an expert. It’s experience, projects, relationships and contacts. It’s all about what you’ve done, not what you claim you can do.

So what can you do? Go ahead and be awesome at what you do. And then get even better. And then focus on what you’ve accomplished. People will know how to appreciate that.

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“Hashtags don’t make you an expert.”
– Miloš Đekić, milos.djekic.net

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17 Feb

From a big company to a small startup

jobs_jobs_jobsAs some of you have noticed by viewing my Working Experience page, I’ve changed my job in December 2012. I was a Solutions Consultant at PSTech, a great company from Serbia. A lot of people asked me how I could abandon such a fine position and career promise. This article will be an attempt to answer that question.

For starters, I would like to consider some of the reasons why people change their jobs:

  • FInancial benefits (“I should have a bigger salary!”)
  • Lousy working atmosphere (“These people annoy me, and that guy has the most idiotic mustache ever!”)
  • Poor career development options (“Are they ever going to consider me for that team lead position or what?”)
  • An unexpected opportunity (“Oh, my cousin from Sweden just offered me a dream job. So long suckers!”)
  • The brief (or not so brief) moment of insanity (“Everything’s great! I’m leaving!”)

People change their jobs for a variety of reasons but with a common motive: we all want a better life and we think we are smart enough to recognize that changing our job would benefit the cause. Yes, a lot of people do it because they don’t have a choice or they are being forced by other people or life itself. Fortunately, I had the freedom of choice.

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Copyright: Miloš Đekić